Doug and Mike Starn Create Monumental Sculpture for The Metropolitan Museum’s 2010 Roof Garden Installation, Big Bambu to Open April 27th

Digital rendering 1, Doug + Mike Starn on the Roof: Big Bambu
Digital rendering 1, Doug + Mike Starn on the Roof: Big Bambu
American artists Mike and Doug Starn (born 1961) have been invited by The Metropolitan Museum of Art to create a site-specific installation for The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, opening to the public on April 27. The identical twin brothers will present Big Bambu, a monumental bamboo structure ultimately measuring 100 feet long by 50 feet wide by 50 feet high in the form of a cresting wave that will bridge realms of sculpture, architecture, and performance. Visitors are meant to witness the creation and evolving incarnations of Big Bambu as it is constructed throughout the spring, summer, and fall by the artists and a team of rock climbers. Set against Central Park and its urban backdrop, Doug + Mike Starn on the Roof: Big Bambu will suggest the complexity and energy of an ever-changing living organism. It will comprise the 13th consecutive single-artist installation for the Cantor Roof Garden. The exhibition is made possible by Bloomberg. Additional support is provided by Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky. The exhibition is also made possible in part by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund. Rope provided by Mammut Sports Group, Inc.
Digital rendering 2, Doug + Mike Starn on the Roof: Big Bambu
Digital rendering 2, Doug + Mike Starn on the Roof: Big Bambu
Gary Tinterow, Engelhard Chairman of the Department of Nineteenth-Century, Modern and Contemporary Art, stated: “Although the Starn brothers are best known for their photographs, in fact their abiding interest is in organic systems and structures, as seen in their photographs of trees, leaves and snow flakes, or here, in Big Bambu. We are intrigued by the possibilities of this ever-evolving structure on our Roof Garden, which, when animated by the team of rock climbers, will become an organic system of its own.” Big Bambu is a continually growing and changing sculpture that will be constructed during the run of the installation from thousands of fresh-cut bamboo poles-a complex network of 3,200 interlocking 30- and 40-foot-long bamboo poles, which will be lashed together with 30 miles of nylon rope. Doug Starn states: “The reason we had to make it so big is to make all of us feel small - or at least to awaken us to the fact that individually we are not so big. Once we’re aware of our true stature we can feel a part of something much more vast than we could ever have dreamed of before.” www.metmuseum.org

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