Campbell Soup Flower Arrangement for Thanksgiving

 
Campbell Soup Flower Arrangement by CarlisleFlowers.net
Campbell Soup Flower Arrangement by CarlisleFlowers.net
Rarely when discussed the line-up for Thanksgiving dinner is there mention of soup. Pumpkin pies, sweet potato casseroles, onion dip and roasted turkey might translate into creative ingredients for post-game festivities but the in-between football games dinner certainly would never include a bowl of tomato soup.  So when I arrived at the relatives for our turkey dinner with this Campbell soup can full of flowers, a woman stopped in her tracks.  "A bowl of soup," she said.  "No, it's Andy Wharhol!" The ingredients for our tomato soup include:  mums, roses, sunflowers, carns, eucalyptus, and sunset safari.  The caloric intake, sodium content and how many servings this can contains will have to be referred to Safeway, Towson, MD. Now, back to the game. "Oh, can I interrupt for one more second? Serve these ingredients cool."    

Frederick and Louise Vanderbilt Gardens, the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt Historic Sites, National Park Services, Hyde Park, New York

National Park Service, Photo Courtesy W.D. Urbin
Vanderbilt Gardens, Hyde Park, NY, National Park Service, Photo Courtesy W.D. Urbin
Frederick and Louise Vanderbilt bought a 600 acre estate in Hyde Park overlooking the Hudson River Valley in 1895.  McKim, Meade and White, well-known architects from New York were hired to build a new home.  Frederick Vanderbilt with a keen interest in horticulture oversaw the installation of an Italian formal garden.  His garden was tiered, the multiple levels dedicated to specific types of plants: annuals, perennials, shrubs and roses.  The gardens boast 6,000 annuals and 1,800 roses many of which are vintage. Vanderbilt sought to follow the mirror image of an Italian garden with a line drawn either horizontally or vertically.  Often Mr. Vanderbilt would win local competition at flower shows in Dutchess County, New York. A Plant Sale of annuals, perennials and shrubs some from the Vanderbilt gardens or supplied by the volunteers and their gardens will take place on Saturday, May 28th.
Vanderbilt Gardens, Hyde Park, NY, National Park Service, Photo Courtesy W.D. Urbin
Vanderbilt Gardens, Hyde Park, NY, National Park Service, Photo Courtesy W.D. Urbin
For information contact: vanderbiltgarden.org Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Sites National Park Service  845-229-9115

David Culp, Guest Speaker at Ladew Topiary Garden Festival

Ladew Topiary Gardens
Ladew Topiary Gardens
David Culp, grower, gardener, and soon to be author spoke at Ladew Topiary Garden in Monkon, Maryland during the Garden Festival this May.  His historical overview of garden styles showed the formality of Versailles to the English picturesque style of nature.  Williamsburg, Mr. Culp noted, had a great influence on American gardening.  "Now the clipped hedges are back in fashion." The use of the vernacular translated by Mr. Culp was to use what you have - a stone wall, a picket fence, or if you are so lucky a long hedgerow to open up to a wide pastoral scene there at Ladew. The crowd of gardeners packed into Ladew's Barn Gallery were given a most informative hand-out as the Brandywine Valley gardener explained the composition of a perennial bed: spikes like Kniphofa 'Vanilla", Cups and Daisies like Helenium autumnale, Plumes as in Persicaria polymorhpa, umbels such as eupatorium 'Gateway', globes - Allium 'Mt. Everest', Weavers like nepeta, Grasses as in Calamagrostis acutiflora 'Karl Foerster' and lastly colored foliage like Tradescantia 'Sweet Kate." Mr. Culp emphasized that a gardener should look at texture first before color.   As to color, "look around you, see what you like," he said.  "There should be repetition of color and shape." He finished with his favorite gardens to visit - Bartram's Garden, Sissinghurst, Wave Hill, and of course local gardens for their vegetables.
Ladew Topiary Gardens/>
Ladew Topiary Gardens
David Culp, grower of hellebores,  bought a 1790's farmhouse and adjoining two acres in 1990. The farmhouse is located between the forks of the Brandywines and nestled into the hillside. Affectionately referred to as Brandywine Cottage, its many gardens are planted in a naturalistic style. Similar to a Pennsylvania county garden, it includes many collections (such as) galanthus, roses, hepaticas, cyclamen, euphorbias, arums, peonies, iris, and of course, the specialty of the house, hellebores. The garden contains a series of plant habitats dedicated to 4 seasons of interest. The gardens closest to the house were developed first. This includes a raised bed that has became home to a number of small rarities that might have been lost in a larger setting, and the walled ruin, or rock garden, which first had to be cleared of tires, automobile fenders, and other accumulated junk left from years of neglect. The transformation of the overgrown hillside began about seven years ago. The under story on the hill was a six-foot-high tangle of invasive vines and shrubs which had to be cut down twice by hand before any planting could begin. Like all gardens his is a work in progress. www.LadewGardens.com www.davidlculp.com/aboutus.htm

“Mrs. Whaley and Her Charleston Garden” by Emily Whaley In Conversation With William Baldwin

Mrs. Whaley's Garden, Courtesy Martha Whaley
Mrs. Whaley's Garden, Courtesy Martha Whaley
Mrs. Whaley's Garden Room, Courtesy Martha Whaley
Mrs. Whaley's Garden Room, Courtesy Martha Whaley
Mrs. Whaley's  Charleston garden measures 30 feet by 110 feet and stands behind an 18th century clapboard home.  Charleston is known as "the City of Gardens" and William Baldwin said Mrs. Whaley's garden is the most visited private garden in the United States.  Mrs. Whaley said she never walked in the garden without clippers in her hand.  Essential to a garden were boundaries, a large evergreen to anchor and than smaller trees to create the lived in space.  Hers was a garden of rooms, a design that had been laid out by Loutrel Briggs, a noted landscape architect from New York who wintered in Charleston and designed many of the city gardens and country plantations. Emily gave a verbal tour of her garden to William Baldwin in the book, "Mrs. Whaley and her Charleston Garden." The tour takes place in April, "the most beautiful month of Charleston," she said.  Roses, oleanders, parkisonia, azaleas create structure to the garden and irises and ferns fill in.  She used both annuals and perennials, but tore both out at the end of the season.  Loutrel Briggs used circles in his designs, statuary for focal points, and water, even still water to act as a reflecting pool.  Paths take the explorer round hidden rooms to establish a one to one relationship with plants. Briggs established rooms for contemplation, rest, conversation.  He used a lawn as a quiet part of the garden. Mrs. Whaley's Garden is on tour during the Historic Charleston Foundation House and Garden Tour. A complete calendar of events and ticket prices can be found at www.historiccharleston.org or by calling 843-722-3405.